Why We Exist

Why We Exist

Overcoming the Gender Gap

Girls and the Confidence Gap

Stark gender differences are evident when students express how they perceive their abilities; and data shows that a lack of confidence is negatively affecting girls in the classroom. Research suggests that low confidence among teenage girls will result in failing to achieve their professional potential as women. In fact, only one in three girls with low self-esteem is confident in having a successful career; and this low self-esteem drastically reduces the likelihood of girls to follow ambitious career paths.

The good news is that this is a trait that can be reversed with action. eGirl Power empowers girls to improve their confidence, self-esteem, and achieve their full potential.

Did You Know?
Girls who have participated in the eGirl Power program showed average gains of 20% improvement in self-esteem, as measured in self-esteem surveys provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Next Generation of Future Leaders

Research shows that self-esteem and confidence are key to fostering the next generation of future leaders and breaking the glass ceiling.

Females are underrepresented in leadership positions in the U.S. across all sectors and industries, and as it now stands, less than 5% of CEOs in the U.S. are females.

Overcoming the Double Bind

AAPI females also face the double bind of both the Bamboo Ceiling and the Glass Ceiling, as the most underrepresented group in leadership in the U.S. The eGirl Power AAPI Initiative works to overcome this double bind AAPI female underpresentation, and the misrepresentation of AAPI women in harmful, enduring stereotypes that contribute to the marginalization, invisibility, and oppression of AAPI females today.

Career Exploration

Educating girls and exposing them to career possibilities, especially in STEM and cybersecurity, at an early age is critical because young students start to form lasting opinions about potential future careers. In fact, 69 percent of women who have not pursued careers in information technology attribute their choice to not knowing what opportunities are available to them, as shared by the Computing Technology Industry Association. Investing in girls is key to narrowing the gender gap in STEM and cybersecurity.